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Asbestos Job Sites

Have you been injured from Asbestos?
Michigan Asbestos Jobsites

Are you at risk?

Our dedicated Michigan mesothelioma lawyers and paralegals have taken the time to compose a comprehensive database of known Asbestos Exposure Jobsites across the entire state of Michigan. Asbestos cases are complex. Often our clients have worked at several different job sites, had a half dozen or more employers, and dealt with products from hundreds of manufacturers. When that client finds out they’ve got an asbestos cancer, there is a lot of leg work required to figure out what asbestos containing products were present, when, and where. This is information we’ve been collecting for decades.

Type in the name of the facility or city you or your loved one worked in. If you or your loved one has worked at any of the locations found in our database, you may be entitled to monetary compensation.

Find where you were exposed.

Search Michigan Asbestos Jobsites

Michigan Asbestos Jobsites

Asbestos Lawsuits, Michigan, & Experience

Thousands of Americans were exposed to asbestos on the job in Michigan. Michigan asbestos jobsites are dangerous. Connecting the dots between places, products, and people you worked with over a career can be a challenging and complicated process. However, knowing the places you worked, what products were used there, and having the corroborating testimony of coworkers are all important factors in successfully pursuing your asbestos lawsuit in Michigan.

We can assist you with your Michigan asbestos claim. Over the past three decades representing Michigan asbestos disease victims GPW has accumulated thousands of pages of corporate documentation regarding asbestos product use, a vast knowledge of asbestos products, hundreds of depositions, and an extensive knowledge of job sites throughout Michigan. For a client who couldn’t recall anything beyond the green design on the bags of asbestos material that were delivered to his plant, we were able to locate a picture of the bag and shipping invoices indicating their delivery to the worksite.

Whether you lived in Michigan for years or just during one summer years ago, we have the knowledge and resources track down the companies, products, & places where your asbestos exposure occurred. Our asbestos lawyers and support staff are familiar with long gone job sites and thousands of asbestos-containing products not only used in Michigan, but nationwide. If you are looking for an asbestos lawyer in Michigan, please contact us today to see how we can help you.

 
Goldberg Persky and White P.C.

Asbestos Exposure and Cancer Risk

What is asbestos?

Asbestos is the name given to six minerals that occur naturally in the environment as bundles of fibers that can be separated into thin, durable threads for use in commercial and industrial applications. These fibers are resistant to heat, fire, and chemicals and do not conduct electricity. For these reasons, asbestos has been used widely in many industries. Additional asbestos-like minerals are found in the natural environment, including erionite.

How is asbestos used?

Asbestos has been mined and used commercially in North America since the late 1800s. Its use increased greatly during World War II. Since then, asbestos has been used in many industries. For example, asbestos insulation and refractory materials were used widely in high temperature areas throughout Steel Mills, Foundries and Powerhouses. The shipbuilding industry has used asbestos to insulate boilers, steam pipes, and hot water pipes. The automotive industry uses asbestos in vehicle brake shoes and clutch pads. Asbestos has also been used in ceiling and floor tiles; paints, coatings, and adhesives; and plastics. In addition, asbestos has been found in vermiculite-containing garden products and some talc-containing crayons.

What are the health hazards of exposure to asbestos?

People may be exposed to asbestos in their workplace, their communities, or their homes. If products containing asbestos are disturbed, tiny asbestos fibers are released into the air. When asbestos fibers are breathed in, they may get trapped in the lungs and remain there for a long time. Over time, these fibers can accumulate and cause scarring and inflammation, which can affect breathing and lead to Asbestosis and Cancer.

Who is at risk for an asbestos-related disease?

Everyone is exposed to asbestos at some time during their life. Low levels of asbestos are present in the air, water, and soil. However, most people do not become ill from their exposure. People who become ill from asbestos are usually those who are exposed to it on a regular basis, most often in a job where they work directly with the material or through substantial environmental contact.

What factors affect the risk of developing an asbestos-related disease?

Several factors can help to determine how asbestos exposure affects an individual, including:

  • Dose (how much asbestos an individual was exposed to)
  • Duration (how long an individual was exposed)
  • Size, shape, and chemical makeup of the asbestos fibers
  • Source of the exposure

How does smoking affect risk?

Many studies have shown that the combination of smoking and asbestos exposure is particularly hazardous. Smokers who are also exposed to asbestos have a risk of developing lung cancer that is greater than the individual risks from asbestos and smoking added together . There is evidence that quitting smoking will reduce the risk of lung cancer among asbestos-exposed workers . Smoking combined with asbestos exposure does not appear to increase the risk of mesothelioma . However, people who were exposed to asbestos on the job at any time during their life or who suspect they may have been exposed should not smoke.

How are asbestos-related diseases detected?

Individuals who have been exposed (or suspect they have been exposed) to asbestos fibers on the job, through the environment, or at home via a family contact should inform their doctor about their exposure history and whether or not they experience any symptoms. The symptoms of asbestos-related diseases may not become apparent for many decades after the exposure. It is particularly important to check with a doctor if any of the following symptoms develop:

  • Shortness of breath, wheezing, or hoarseness
  • A persistent cough that gets worse over time
  • Blood in the sputum (fluid) coughed up from the lungs
  • Pain or tightening in the chest
  • Difficulty swallowing
  • Swelling of the neck or face
  • Loss of appetite
  • Weight loss
  • Fatigue or anemia

How can workers protect themselves from asbestos exposure?

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) is a component of the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) and is the Federal agency responsible for health and safety regulations in maritime, construction, manufacturing, and service workplaces. OSHA established regulations dealing with asbestos exposure on the job, specifically in construction work, shipyards, and general industry, that employers are required to follow. In addition, the Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA), another component of DOL, enforces regulations related to mine safety. Workers should use all protective equipment provided by their employers and follow recommended workplace practices and safety procedures. For example, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH)-approved respirators that fit properly should be worn by workers when required.

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