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Asbestos Legislation: Bruce Vento Ban Asbestos and Prevent Mesothelioma Act

After six years, the U.S. Senate finally, and unanimously, passed Senator Patty Murray’s Ban Asbestos in America Act last October. The act prohibits asbestos where present at more than 1% by weight, calls for a public education campaign about the dangers of asbestos exposure, and directs critically-needed federal research to begin to develop treatments for mesothelioma and other asbestos-related diseases. On Thursday February 28 at 12:30 PM EST, the House Energy and Commerce Committee will hold a hearing on Minnesota Democrat Rep. Betty L. McCollum’s "Bruce Vento Ban Asbestos and Prevent Mesothelioma Act" (HR 3339); a piece of companion legislation to...

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Jury awards $6 million to Shaler couple for asbestos injuries

From the Pittsburgh Post Gazette: A jury has awarded $6 million to a Shaler couple for injuries the husband received after repeated exposure to asbestos. The Common Pleas Court jury ordered DeZurik Inc. of Sartell, Minn., to pay the money to William and Lois Lisac. William Lisac, 62, a member of Steamfitters Local 449 for more than 40 years, was exposed to asbestos during the 1960s and 1970s when he worked with valves, gaskets and other products that contained the material at power plants, chemical plants and steel mills. He said DeZurik never warned him that he was working with a dangerous and...

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Asbestosis Can Lead to Lung Cancer or Mesothelioma

Asbestosis, while not a cancerous condition, is serious and potentially life-threatening chronic disease that is caused by breathing in asbestos fibers. A person who has been diagnosed with asbestosis has a much higher chance of developing lung cancer or pleural mesothelioma, a fatal cancer affecting the lining of the lungs. While not all asbestosis cases will progress to cancer, asbestosis can be a strong indicator that asbestos exposure was a factor in the development of a malignancy. Similar to mesothelioma, in asbestosis, asbestos fibers make their way to the lungs and become embedded in the inner tissue. The tissue then scars...

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